Sage Honey – Sore Throat Remedy

Sage

Salvia officinalis

Common sage, what a remarkable plant. Its true healing properties have been captured in its name, Salvia. Salvia derives from the Latin salvere, meaning “to feel well and healthy, health, heal.”

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Sage herbal actions include: anti-bacterial, antifungal, antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, sore throat, excessive sweating, infections, type 2 diabetes, toothache, sore muscles, hot flashes, high cholesterol, and Alzheimer’s disease. *Sage is drying and should be avoided if you are nursing (unless you want to reduce milk production!)

Sage Honey time!

Sage is a very drying herb making it not ideal for those who are naturally dry, like myself. However, I do love a good sage tea with honey every now and again to soothe a sore throat. One of my favorite sore throat remedies, aside from tea, is Sage honey. You know that sinus discharge and excessive coughing that might happen during a cold? Well, typically that can lead to a raw inflamed throat. No worries though, if you have sage and honey you’re golden! A tablespoon will soothe the throat and if added to a warm tea it can stimulate sweating and salivation thus thinning the mucus. In other words, it makes you feel better.

Sage Honey Recipe

You will need:

  • Sanitized glass mason jar
  • Fresh or dry sage – ½ jar when using fresh, ¼ jar when using dry, I prefer fresh but both work well!
  • Raw honey to fill the entire jar to the tippity top, locally sourced is a plus

What to do:

Sanitize your jars and allow them to dry completely

Chop your fresh sage up as fine as you can and fill jar about half way, if you’re using dry fill jar ¼ full with dry cut and sifted herb

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Fill the jar with honey to the very top, I use chopsticks or wooden skewers to move the herbs around and release any air bubbles. You may need to add more honey the following day as the herbs start to settle.

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Cover the jar with a lid and allow it to sit and chill-out for 2-4 weeks

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Use as needed

*Some people will strain the herbs out, I find this to be a HUGE mess. So if you’re not using roots, bark, and herbs that are difficult to consume, I’d suggest you leave em’ in there!

Other Honey Infusion ideas:

Cinnamon

Marshmallow Root Powder

Ginger

Lavender

Rose Petals

Lemon Balm

Basil

Chamomile

Hops

Peppermint

Vanilla

Rosemary

Thyme

The options are limitless so go wild and explore!  Cheers

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