Red Clover Lemonade

Looking for a refreshing beverage this summer? This super tasty drink is it! Made with red clover, lemon, and raw honey, it’s the perfect combination to cool you off during the warmer months. Curious about the taste? Think Arnold Palmer.

Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) is a nutritive herb containing many phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. The flowering tops taste sweet and can be added to salads, infused in vinegar, and of course, lemonade! 

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Identifying red clover is quite simple. Red clover grows 1-2 in height from a central crown. The leaves have three parts (trifoliate) and have a lightly colored crescent or chevron on each leaflet. The flower heads are light pink to purple in color and consist of many individual flowers clumped together. When harvesting, avoid flowers that are brown or have a powdery mildew on them.

Red Clover Lemonade

3 cups fresh red clover blossoms or 1 1/2 cups dried

4 cups water

1 cup lemon juice

8 tablespoons raw honey

Once you’ve gathered your ingredients, you’ll want to boil the blossoms in water for 5 minutes. Next, strain the blossoms and compost. Add the lemon juice and raw honey to the warm liquid, stirring until well blended.  Chill in the refrigerator and enjoy!  Planning ahead, you can add some flower blossom and petal ice cubes to your drink. This is a really fun and simple way to bring a punch of color to your lemonade. Some edible flowers that work well in ice cubes include rose petals, violets, borage, and carnations.

Special considerations for Red Clover

As of now, it is recommended to avoid red clover in people who have (or have had) estrogen-receptor positive cancer.

There has been some concern that red clover may thin the blood, but this seems to be a concern for red clover that is fermented or not properly dried.

Red clover has not been established as safe during pregnancy and lactation.

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